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MEET THE CREATIVES

Jan Bernet on Time Will Tell

Valentine del Giudice
April 24, 2020
April 24, 2020

8 years in the making, Time Will Tell is a project led by Jan Bernet in which he seeks to find an answer to "if everything is temporary, what is forever and if nothing belongs, what will ever be mine?". Presented in a zine, Time Will Tell explores the concept of impermanence through photographs, personal poems and writings by Nietzsche. The project ended with a multidisciplinary exhibition, where Jan invited other artists to consider the notion of impermanence through their own medium. Artists included Clara and Elena Brea (Live AV) Mai Nguyen Tri (Butoh dance performance) Overbeck (Live A), Max Burstyn (interactive AV installation) Denise Padrón Benitez (V Installation) Jay (Sculpture) We had the chance to ask Jan a few questions about the story behind the project, how he used art as a form of therapy, and how he worked collaboratively with Raquel on such a personal project.

COVID-19 UK FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Are you getting all the help available to you?

As creative practitioners, we are aware it can be difficult to navigate between financial
options available depending on your status. Make sure you are getting all the financial help
available to you by using the table below.
We will keep on updating it with new resources to always provide the most up-to-date financial support info for you!

* If you have another employment paid through PAYE your employer may be able to get support using the Job Retention Scheme.

COVID-19 UK FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Are you getting all the help available to you?

As creative practitioners, we are aware it can be difficult to navigate between financial
options available depending on your status. Make sure you are getting all the financial help
available to you by using the table below.
We will keep on updating it with new resources to always provide the most up-to-date financial support info for you!

* If you have another employment paid through PAYE your employer may be able to get support using the Job Retention Scheme.

About the project

The Zine

24pp newspaper style, 420 x 297mm
Printed 4/4 on 55gsm Newsprint

‘if everything is temporary, what is forever and if nothing belongs, what will ever be mine?

Through loss and change we are all experiencing these notions of impermanence and it affects us in various ways.
In regards of love, friendship, career, life and death; external factors that impact us emotionally, or whether we experience
it from inside out, thought and action create external effect.

The photographic work I created in these times often reflected on what I was experiencing. The images seemed to build  a link between
my internal thoughts and my external reality. They surfaced questions and helped me to understand my current reality, let go of attachment
and see the teachings rather than grief.

The zine is limited to 50 editions and is available on janbernet.com

— Jan Bernet

The Zine

24pp newspaper style, 420 x 297mm
Printed 4/4 on 55gsm Newsprint

‘if everything is temporary, what is forever and if nothing belongs, what will ever be mine?

Through loss and change we are all experiencing these notions of impermanence and it affects us in various ways. In regards of love, friendship, career, life and death; external factors that impact us emotionally, or whether we experience it from inside out, thought and action create external effect.

The photographic work I created in these times often reflected on what I was experiencing. The images seemed to build  a link between
my internal thoughts and my external reality. They surfaced questions and helped me to understand my current reality, let go of attachment
and see the teachings rather than grief.

The zine is limited to 50 editions and is available on janbernet.com


— Jan Bernet

The Creators

The Creative

Jan Bernet
Raquel Vieira Da Silva

Universal Credit (1)

You may be able to get Universal Credit if:
• you’re on a low income or out of work
• you’re 18 or over (there are some exceptions if you’re 16 to 17)
• you’re under State Pension age
• you and your partner have £16,000 or less in savings between you
• you live in the UK

MORE INFO

COVID-19 Job Retention Scheme (3)

If you have employees, you can claim for 80% of their wages plus any employer National Insurance and pension contributions, if you have put them on furlough because of coronavirus. If you have an other employment paid through PAYE your employer may be able to get support using the Job Retention Scheme.

MORE INFO



Claim back Statutory Sick Pay paid to employees due to coronavirus (3)

The repayment will cover up to 2 weeks starting from the first day of sickness, if an employee is unable to work because they either: have coronavirus, cannot work because they are self-isolating at home or are shielding in line with public health guidance.

MORE INFO

HMRC’s Time To Pay (5)

You can claim if you’re a self-employed individual or a member of a partnership and you:
• have submitted your Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018 to 2019
• traded in the tax year 2019 to 2020
• are trading when you apply, or would be except for coronavirus
• intend to continue to trade in the tax year 2020 to 2021
• have lost trading pro ts due to coronavirus
• your trading profits must also be no more than £50,000 and more than half of your total income

MORE INFO

Small Business Grant Fund (SBGF) & Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) (7)

Small Business Grant Fund Eligibility:
• Businesses with a property that on the 11 March 2020 were eligible for Small Business Rate Relief (SBRR) Scheme.
• Businesses which on 11 March 2020 were eligible for relief under the Rural Rate Relief
• Scheme are also eligible for this scheme.
Eligible recipients will receive one grant per property.

Hospitality and Leisure Grand Fund Eligibility:
• Properties which on the 11 March 2020 had a rateable value of less than £51,000 and would have been eligible for a discount under the business rates
• Expanded Retail Discount Scheme had that scheme been in force are eligible for the grant.
• Charities which would otherwise meet this criteria but whose bill for 11 March had been reduced to nil by a local discretionary award should still be considered to be eligible for the RHL grant.
• Recipients will receive one grant per eligible property

No need to do anything you’ll be contacted by HRMC if you’re eligible

MORE INFO

Council Tax Reduction (2)

You could be eligible if you’re on a low income or claim benefits. Your bill could be reduced by up to 100%. You can apply if you own your home, rent, are unemployed or working.

MORE INFO

HRMC income support scheme (4)

You can claim if you’re a self-employed individual or a member of a partnership and you:
• have submitted your Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018 to 2019
• traded in the tax year 2019 to 2020
• are trading when you apply, or would be except for coronavirus
• intend to continue to trade in the tax year2020 to 2021
• have lost trading profits due to coronavirus

You will need to confirm to HMRC that your business has been adversely affected by coronavirus. HMRC will as usual use a risk based approach to compliance.

Your trading profits must also be no more than £50,000 and more than half of your total income for either:
• the tax year 2018 to 2019
• the average of the tax years 2016 to 2017, 2017 to 2018, and 2018 to 2019

MORE INFO

Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (6)

You’re eligible if:
• your business is based in the UK
• your business has an annual turnover of up to £45 million
• your business has a borrowing proposal which the lender would consider viable, if not for the coronavirus pandemic
• you can self-certify that your business has been adversely impacted by coronavirus

MORE INFO

Creative industry-specific Grants & Funds (8)

We've compiled a list of grants and prizes available to UK residents, which you can filter by creative industry, to make sure you're seeing grants that are relevant to your practice. We'll be doing our best to keep this list up-to-date with the latest grants and initiatives to support creatives around the UK. All grants listed are open for applications and are automatically removed after the deadline. 

If you are feeling anxious, wondering what the coronavirus crisis means for your practice, feel free to reach out to us at any time.

We’re not experts, but we’re happy to share our knowledge and to try to help you stay optimistic during these tough times. You can contact us from our website chat or on any social media.

MORE INFO

Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) (9)

The scheme helps small and medium-sized businesses to borrow between £2,000 and up to 25% of their turnover. The maximum loan available is £50,000. The government guarantees 100% of the loan and there won’t be any fees or interest to pay for the first 12 months. After 12 months the interest rate will be 2.5% a year.
You can apply for a loan if your business:
• is based in the UK was established before 1 March 2020
• has been adversely impacted by the coronavirus

MORE INFO

Universal Credit (1)

You may be able to get Universal Credit if:
• you’re on a low income or out of work
• you’re 18 or over (there are some exceptions if you’re 16 to 17)
• you’re under State Pension age
• you and your partner have £16,000 or less in savings between you
• you live in the UK

MORE INFO

Council Tax Reduction (2)

You could be eligible if you’re on a low income or claim benefits. Your bill could be reduced by up to 100%. You can apply if you own your home, rent, are unemployed or working.

MORE INFO

COVID-19 Job Retention Scheme (3)

If you have employees, you can claim for 80% of their wages plus any employer National Insurance and pension contributions, if you have put them on furlough because of coronavirus. If you have an other employment paid through PAYE your employer may be able to get support using the Job Retention Scheme.

MORE INFO



Claim back Statutory Sick Pay paid to employees due to coronavirus (3)

The repayment will cover up to 2 weeks starting from the first day of sickness, if an employee is unable to work because they either: have coronavirus, cannot work because they are self-isolating at home or are shielding in line with public health guidance.

MORE INFO

HRMC income support scheme (4)

You can claim if you’re a self-employed individual or a member of a partnership and you:
• have submitted your Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018 to 2019
• traded in the tax year 2019 to 2020
• are trading when you apply, or would be except for coronavirus
• intend to continue to trade in the tax year2020 to 2021
• have lost trading profits due to coronavirus

You will need to confirm to HMRC that your business has been adversely affected by coronavirus. HMRC will as usual use a risk based approach to compliance.

Your trading profits must also be no more than £50,000 and more than half of your total income for either:
• the tax year 2018 to 2019
• the average of the tax years 2016 to 2017, 2017 to 2018, and 2018 to 2019

MORE INFO

HMRC’s Time To Pay (5)

You can claim if you’re a self-employed individual or a member of a partnership and you:
• have submitted your Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018 to 2019
• traded in the tax year 2019 to 2020
• are trading when you apply, or would be except for coronavirus
• intend to continue to trade in the tax year 2020 to 2021
• have lost trading pro ts due to coronavirus
• your trading profits must also be no more than £50,000 and more than half of your total income

MORE INFO

Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (6)

You’re eligible if:
• your business is based in the UK
• your business has an annual turnover of up to £45 million
• your business has a borrowing proposal which the lender would consider viable, if not for the coronavirus pandemic
• you can self-certify that your business has been adversely impacted by coronavirus

MORE INFO

Small Business Grant Fund (SBGF) & Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) (7)

Small Business Grant Fund Eligibility:
• Businesses with a property that on the 11 March 2020 were eligible for Small Business Rate Relief (SBRR) Scheme.
• Businesses which on 11 March 2020 were eligible for relief under the Rural Rate Relief
• Scheme are also eligible for this scheme.
Eligible recipients will receive one grant per property.

Hospitality and Leisure Grand Fund Eligibility:
• Properties which on the 11 March 2020 had a rateable value of less than £51,000 and would have been eligible for a discount under the business rates
• Expanded Retail Discount Scheme had that scheme been in force are eligible for the grant.
• Charities which would otherwise meet this criteria but whose bill for 11 March had been reduced to nil by a local discretionary award should still be considered to be eligible for the RHL grant.
• Recipients will receive one grant per eligible property

No need to do anything you’ll be contacted by HRMC if you’re eligible

MORE INFO

Creative industry-specific Grants & Funds (8)

We've compiled a list of grants and prizes available to UK residents, which you can filter by creative industry, to make sure you're seeing grants that are relevant to your practice. We'll be doing our best to keep this list up-to-date with the latest grants and initiatives to support creatives around the UK. All grants listed are open for applications and are automatically removed after the deadline. 

If you are feeling anxious, wondering what the coronavirus crisis means for your practice, feel free to reach out to us at any time.

We’re not experts, but we’re happy to share our knowledge and to try to help you stay optimistic during these tough times. You can contact us from our website chat or on any social media.

MORE INFO

Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) (9)

The scheme helps small and medium-sized businesses to borrow between £2,000 and up to 25% of their turnover. The maximum loan available is £50,000. The government guarantees 100% of the loan and there won’t be any fees or interest to pay for the first 12 months. After 12 months the interest rate will be 2.5% a year.
You can apply for a loan if your business:
• is based in the UK was established before 1 March 2020
• has been adversely impacted by the coronavirus

MORE INFO
Pleasure to have you with us Jan! Can you tell us more about the name of your latest project, Time will Tell?

The name in itself is interesting because the project basically emerged by itself. As an artist, when you work, your finger paints and then sometimes things crystallize by themselves. You didn't plan to start a new project, or you didn't know that what you're working on can actually lead to something greater than you imagined. It's a really organic approach, as the approach is created within yourself rather than you trying to make sense of things.


What is the story behind Time Will Tell?

Around eight years ago, I moved to London from Switzerland. I wasn't really happy there. I was working on various things, thinking that I had to follow a career in banking, like most people do over there. Everyone puts a lot of pressure on you to be successful. When I arrived in London, I started doing photography, and then I suddenly realized that I finally found a way to express how I truly feel. When I reflect on my time in Switzerland, I remember this feeling of being caged or suppressed. Photography enabled me to explore my inner self, my own thoughts, my own ideas. 

I was 22 years old when I came to London and I didn't know much about myself and the world, to be honest. During the following seven years, I used photography as a tool to make sense of all things I was experiencing. I was taking photos everywhere: when I was on the streets, or taking the bus, or walking home. I was also taking photographs whenever I was going through emotional distress, whether it was because of a relationship or in regards to my career.

I realised that I was often experiencing the feeling of impermanence, which is the idea that things don't last. All the photographs I took during these years and the emotions associated with them brought Time Will Tell to fruition. 


Why do you feel impermanence is such an interesting topic to explore?

Because it has to do with life itself. Everybody experiences it. Everybody is affected by it and by a feeling of losing and finding at the same time. Even if we can get really attached to things, we realize in the end that nothing on this planet is permanent. Whatever it is, whether a person dies, whether we lose something, or when something is being taken away from us, we realize that nothing lasts forever.  

I have all these photos that were taken during those times that reflected these emotions, and they helped me understand the meaning of impermanence.

But I wanted to translate this beyond the photographs, I took all these images, my thoughts and my research from the books I was reading, the conversations I was having with people about impermanence, and expressed them into a project that became Time Will Tell.


"As often when I lost, I also found", these words are very strong and come from a very personal place, and it makes me wonder if you see the act of creating as a form of therapy?

I've always known that photography is very therapeutic for me. Looking at the photos and then seeing their relationship to my life, or simply the act of taking photos itself, have helped me make sense of my emotions. My approach to taking photos is very free. I'm not going out there to take a specific photo or look for specific subjects. No, no, no. I'm walking outside with my phone in my hand taking pictures whenever I feel like it. I'm taking a photo when I'm allowed to take a photo, when the opportunity kicks. I don't take a photo. The photo makes me take it. 

I have a really good phone camera that I can use everywhere. It's such a small thing that it's not as intrusive as a big camera, for example. Taking pictures whenever I wanted was critical in the way that it helped me deal with everyday life. It gave me this peace and helped me get through the days.  

The entire process was really helpful, as it helped me comprehend. When you want to learn something, you write it down because it gives you another element of understanding, another perspective. Similarly, when you have emotions to understand, you have to write about them, talk about them, express them in order for you to work through those emotions.


Do you feel Time Will Tell had to become a magazine?

I wanted it to look and feel like a newspaper, because they are traded every day but as soon as the day ends, they lose all value. They're virtually worthless, because the next day we have new information that replaces yesterday's information. Newspapers are the literal representation impermanence. 

I also make videos, and I could have thought of other options to translate this impermanence. But, I took that collection of photos and decided to created a magazine with it, because I wanted to translate all these thoughts, ideas, and emotions into something tangible. When I put these pieces together, that’s when I really understood what this entire project was telling me: everything is temporary. But by finishing this project, for me, it was also like coming to terms with the reality of impermanence. The project is done; now, I understand it; I own it. 


You collaborated with Raquel Vieira Da Silva, a graphic designer. Can you tell us more about her?

Raquel is a big thinker, she's fucking smart. I worked with her, not just because she has the skills. No, I worked with her because she felt right to work with. 

It's like when you meet your life partner for the first time. Suddenly they're there, and it's evident. Raquel and I shared the same visions and working together just felt very natural. I wrote a brief of the elements I wanted in the magazine, with which photos, but also which texts. But then, all the rest was open for her own interpretation.

For example, there is a poem that I wrote, which talks about the state of life and how I see the world, and it is really personal. It's like singing. You don't just sing in front of everybody. You show that only to certain people. It’s the same with my poetry. I wrote a lot of poetry in the past 10 years but I would rarely show it to people. I decided to show it to her because of our connection. She found the poems so strong and wanted to include them in the project. Because I was not sure it worked with the theme and if I was ready to show them to the world, I told her I wasn’t sure. But, she convinced me to add them to the magazine and now I can’t imagine the it without them. Because I trusted her both personally and professionally and because I trusted her feelings and experience, I was able to let her take such a big decision. 


So Raquel didn’t only help with designing the magazine, she also had an important input on the content itself. Do you think collaborating always impact positively the creation process?

Collaborations are not just there to fill a gap when you are missing a certain skills or practice for your project. Collaboration are about making the other person even stronger. I think that's the core value of true collaboration. But, you cannot just collaborate with anybody. You have to have some sort of similar understanding, similar backgrounds, similar vibes. Otherwise a collaboration won't lead to the true, beautiful benefits and connection that it can actually bring. Yes, you can work with a random person and create what you want to create, but that doesn't make you any better, nor does it make the other person better. You can create something, but that doesn't mean that the creation has meaning.

Your project also includes a temporary print project. Can you tell us why you decided to add this perspective?

I had some issues with a malfunctioning ink jet cartridge printer, which, in the end, created amazing results. The slowly running out ink as well as the malfunctioning device resulted in unique abstracted versions of my photographs. I was able to print around 100 images before the ink ran out and the temporary print project came to an end. Then, the printing process was over, because there was no more black ink, no more lines, no more impression, no more. I decided to keep them and create two parts to the project: the magazine and a temporary print project, born as a result of my malfunctioning printer.


You concluded your project with an exhibition where you invited other artists. Why did you choose to bring more voices to Time Will Tell?

I wanted to conclude the project with an exhibition that would include other people's voices, because that was the only way I could guarantee a well-rounded perspective. 

I always wanted to make sure other people’s opinion were also seen and heard in this project. That’s why I included some of the work of Nietzsche. Through considering his different opinion on impermanence to mine, I was able to add another perspective to the project. Things that are true to him can be true to others, and so, I incorporated his writings in the magazine to complement my own views.

For the exhibition, I invited artists who represent or reflect on impermanence through their work and disciplines. you can interpret it in so many various ways, whether it's the environment that is impermanent, or whether it's something personal. At the end, the exhibition had the chance to bring the voices of six artists to the topic: Clara and Elena Brea (Live AV), Mai Nguyen Tri (Butoh dance performance), Overbeck (Live A), Max Burstyn (interactive AV installation), Denise Padrón Benitez (V Installation), and Jay (Sculpture). I felt they were crucial in creating the whole experience, and making sure it wasn’t just my view on the subject.


Time Will Tell is now a finished project, how do you feel about it? Do you think it gave you answers or did it bring more questions?

Yes, it definitely helped me so much. During all these years, the photographs themselves had already helped me. Now that the project came to life, all these things that I collected, all these emotions and experiences are now translated in a physical object. It was the final step to total understanding. You're only a master in something if you're able to explain it to somebody, right? So if you teach something to people, then you master that thing better. Once I was able to turn all of this into something greater, I felt I mastered my relationship to attachment, and now I feel secure about it. It was the finishing touch to understand it, and to just be able to let go of it. Now I feel free to go to the next level. I learned all these things during all these years, and now I can let go of all this pain, all this pain from losing and fighting, and being neglected and being mistreated and being disrespected. It was time to let go of all this.


Thank you for your time, Jan. The magazine is available Jan's website, but feel free to also directly contact him on Instagram or via email.


Pleasure to have you with us Jan! Can you tell us more about the name of your latest project, Time will Tell?

The name in itself is interesting because the project basically emerged by itself. As an artist, when you work, your finger paints and then sometimes things crystallize by themselves. You didn't plan to start a new project, or you didn't know that what you're working on can actually lead to something greater than you imagined. It's a really organic approach, as the approach is created within yourself rather than you trying to make sense of things.


What is the story behind Time Will Tell?

Around eight years ago, I moved to London from Switzerland. I wasn't really happy there. I was working on various things, thinking that I had to follow a career in banking, like most people do over there. Everyone puts a lot of pressure on you to be successful. When I arrived in London, I started doing photography, and then I suddenly realized that I finally found a way to express how I truly feel. When I reflect on my time in Switzerland, I remember this feeling of being caged or suppressed. Photography enabled me to explore my inner self, my own thoughts, my own ideas. 

I was 22 years old when I came to London and I didn't know much about myself and the world, to be honest. During the following seven years, I used photography as a tool to make sense of all things I was experiencing. I was taking photos everywhere: when I was on the streets, or taking the bus, or walking home. I was also taking photographs whenever I was going through emotional distress, whether it was because of a relationship or in regards to my career.

I realised that I was often experiencing the feeling of impermanence, which is the idea that things don't last. All the photographs I took during these years and the emotions associated with them brought Time Will Tell to fruition. 


Why do you feel impermanence is such an interesting topic to explore?

Because it has to do with life itself. Everybody experiences it. Everybody is affected by it and by a feeling of losing and finding at the same time. Even if we can get really attached to things, we realize in the end that nothing on this planet is permanent. Whatever it is, whether a person dies, whether we lose something, or when something is being taken away from us, we realize that nothing lasts forever.  

I have all these photos that were taken during those times that reflected these emotions, and they helped me understand the meaning of impermanence.

But I wanted to translate this beyond the photographs, I took all these images, my thoughts and my research from the books I was reading, the conversations I was having with people about impermanence, and expressed them into a project that became Time Will Tell.


"As often when I lost, I also found", these words are very strong and come from a very personal place, and it makes me wonder if you see the act of creating as a form of therapy?

I've always known that photography is very therapeutic for me. Looking at the photos and then seeing their relationship to my life, or simply the act of taking photos itself, have helped me make sense of my emotions. My approach to taking photos is very free. I'm not going out there to take a specific photo or look for specific subjects. No, no, no. I'm walking outside with my phone in my hand taking pictures whenever I feel like it. I'm taking a photo when I'm allowed to take a photo, when the opportunity kicks. I don't take a photo. The photo makes me take it. 

I have a really good phone camera that I can use everywhere. It's such a small thing that it's not as intrusive as a big camera, for example. Taking pictures whenever I wanted was critical in the way that it helped me deal with everyday life. It gave me this peace and helped me get through the days.  

The entire process was really helpful, as it helped me comprehend. When you want to learn something, you write it down because it gives you another element of understanding, another perspective. Similarly, when you have emotions to understand, you have to write about them, talk about them, express them in order for you to work through those emotions.


Do you feel Time Will Tell had to become a magazine?

I wanted it to look and feel like a newspaper, because they are traded every day but as soon as the day ends, they lose all value. They're virtually worthless, because the next day we have new information that replaces yesterday's information. Newspapers are the literal representation impermanence. 

I also make videos, and I could have thought of other options to translate this impermanence. But, I took that collection of photos and decided to created a magazine with it, because I wanted to translate all these thoughts, ideas, and emotions into something tangible. When I put these pieces together, that’s when I really understood what this entire project was telling me: everything is temporary. But by finishing this project, for me, it was also like coming to terms with the reality of impermanence. The project is done; now, I understand it; I own it. 


You collaborated with Raquel Vieira Da Silva, a graphic designer. Can you tell us more about her?

Raquel is a big thinker, she's fucking smart. I worked with her, not just because she has the skills. No, I worked with her because she felt right to work with. 

It's like when you meet your life partner for the first time. Suddenly they're there, and it's evident. Raquel and I shared the same visions and working together just felt very natural. I wrote a brief of the elements I wanted in the magazine, with which photos, but also which texts. But then, all the rest was open for her own interpretation.

For example, there is a poem that I wrote, which talks about the state of life and how I see the world, and it is really personal. It's like singing. You don't just sing in front of everybody. You show that only to certain people. It’s the same with my poetry. I wrote a lot of poetry in the past 10 years but I would rarely show it to people. I decided to show it to her because of our connection. She found the poems so strong and wanted to include them in the project. Because I was not sure it worked with the theme and if I was ready to show them to the world, I told her I wasn’t sure. But, she convinced me to add them to the magazine and now I can’t imagine the it without them. Because I trusted her both personally and professionally and because I trusted her feelings and experience, I was able to let her take such a big decision. 


So Raquel didn’t only help with designing the magazine, she also had an important input on the content itself. Do you think collaborating always impact positively the creation process?

Collaborations are not just there to fill a gap when you are missing a certain skills or practice for your project. Collaboration are about making the other person even stronger. I think that's the core value of true collaboration. But, you cannot just collaborate with anybody. You have to have some sort of similar understanding, similar backgrounds, similar vibes. Otherwise a collaboration won't lead to the true, beautiful benefits and connection that it can actually bring. Yes, you can work with a random person and create what you want to create, but that doesn't make you any better, nor does it make the other person better. You can create something, but that doesn't mean that the creation has meaning.

Your project also includes a temporary print project. Can you tell us why you decided to add this perspective?

I had some issues with a malfunctioning ink jet cartridge printer, which, in the end, created amazing results. The slowly running out ink as well as the malfunctioning device resulted in unique abstracted versions of my photographs. I was able to print around 100 images before the ink ran out and the temporary print project came to an end. Then, the printing process was over, because there was no more black ink, no more lines, no more impression, no more. I decided to keep them and create two parts to the project: the magazine and a temporary print project, born as a result of my malfunctioning printer.


You concluded your project with an exhibition where you invited other artists. Why did you choose to bring more voices to Time Will Tell?

I wanted to conclude the project with an exhibition that would include other people's voices, because that was the only way I could guarantee a well-rounded perspective. 

I always wanted to make sure other people’s opinion were also seen and heard in this project. That’s why I included some of the work of Nietzsche. Through considering his different opinion on impermanence to mine, I was able to add another perspective to the project. Things that are true to him can be true to others, and so, I incorporated his writings in the magazine to complement my own views.

For the exhibition, I invited artists who represent or reflect on impermanence through their work and disciplines. you can interpret it in so many various ways, whether it's the environment that is impermanent, or whether it's something personal. At the end, the exhibition had the chance to bring the voices of six artists to the topic: Clara and Elena Brea (Live AV), Mai Nguyen Tri (Butoh dance performance), Overbeck (Live A), Max Burstyn (interactive AV installation), Denise Padrón Benitez (V Installation), and Jay (Sculpture). I felt they were crucial in creating the whole experience, and making sure it wasn’t just my view on the subject.


Time Will Tell is now a finished project, how do you feel about it? Do you think it gave you answers or did it bring more questions?

Yes, it definitely helped me so much. During all these years, the photographs themselves had already helped me. Now that the project came to life, all these things that I collected, all these emotions and experiences are now translated in a physical object. It was the final step to total understanding. You're only a master in something if you're able to explain it to somebody, right? So if you teach something to people, then you master that thing better. Once I was able to turn all of this into something greater, I felt I mastered my relationship to attachment, and now I feel secure about it. It was the finishing touch to understand it, and to just be able to let go of it. Now I feel free to go to the next level. I learned all these things during all these years, and now I can let go of all this pain, all this pain from losing and fighting, and being neglected and being mistreated and being disrespected. It was time to let go of all this.


Thank you for your time, Jan. The magazine is available Jan's website, but feel free to also directly contact him on Instagram or via email.


BOOKS

MOVIES

And finally, if you can, donate, sign and share - it can go a long way. Here are links to relevant charities and petitions (donating if you can, or signing and sharing petitions is great immediate help).

BLACK LIVES MATTER, TODAY AND ALWAYS.

All
By
September 14, 2020
Rolling until further notice
Music

Help Musicians: Fusion Fund

How much can you get? £2,000-£5,000

For professional musicians to undertake UK-based projects that develop and test new work, ideas or potential career directions through inspiring periods of collaborative research and development. We want to highlight that in this round we welcome applications that will explore the above through the use of remote, digital or online collaboration tools or performance spaces. For example, the use of Skype rehearsals or live streamed performance.

Eligibility

• UK-resident

• In financial need

• Have an active career as a musician

• Also open to bands up to 6 people

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About the project

The Zine

24pp newspaper style, 420 x 297mm
Printed 4/4 on 55gsm Newsprint

‘if everything is temporary, what is forever and if nothing belongs, what will ever be mine?

Through loss and change we are all experiencing these notions of impermanence and it affects us in various ways.
In regards of love, friendship, career, life and death; external factors that impact us emotionally, or whether we experience
it from inside out, thought and action create external effect.

The photographic work I created in these times often reflected on what I was experiencing. The images seemed to build  a link between
my internal thoughts and my external reality. They surfaced questions and helped me to understand my current reality, let go of attachment
and see the teachings rather than grief.

The zine is limited to 50 editions and is available on janbernet.com

— Jan Bernet

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